Yarns about Yarn

My "Other Best Male Friend" (hereafter "OBMF") gave me the nickname of "Contessa." I have something in common with one countess -- the Countess of Nerole. She and I both favor the scent of orange blossoms. At one masquerade my OBMF threw, I went as the Comtesse des Feuilles (she was better known as Jane Austen's cousin). Finally, in a novel I wrote, which has yet to be published, the protagonist is also a countess. Hence, my choice of the name, "Knitting Countess."

I have been knitting since I was 20, and I am even designing. Don't look for my designs in INTERWEAVE just yet, however.
mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

To momentarily “break” from my usual topic: Your humorous illustration reminds me of a fashion design lesson. Designing a garment with “back interest” is sometimes called “suivez-moi jeune homme” (French for “follow me young man”)!

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

To momentarily “break” from my usual topic: Your humorous illustration reminds me of a fashion design lesson. Designing a garment with “back interest” is sometimes called “suivez-moi jeune homme” (French for “follow me young man”)!

(via empresskyra)

30 Day Knitting Challenge

Day 18: Do you knit English or Continental?

Most of the time, I knit English.  Occasionally, I knit Continental, especially when I think it will help a left-handed beginning knitter.

madamedefargeknits:

knithead:

I want to knit something but I don’t want to work with any of the colors of yarn I have in my stash right now but I also don’t want to go out and buy more yarn do you feel me

ja feel

To be honest, … yes!

makinology:

top picture …man acts as swift as woman knits, 1817….
what is a ‘swift’ ? :

A swift is a tool used to hold a hank of yarn while it is being wound off. It has an adjustable diameter so that it can hold hanks of many sizes, and rotates around a central rod.They are generally made out of wood or metal, however other materials may also be used. In the 18th and 19th centuries, swifts were sometimes made of whale ivory and they are now sought-after antiques. Swifts are not used very much in the textile industry, but are used more by knitters and crocheters who buy their yarn in hank form. The swift allows for easy balling, without the yarn getting tangled and knotted.”  ~wikipedia

similarly, & for the same purpose, to make sure the yarn or fiber doesn’t become tangled, are the ‘spinner’s weasel’ (shown above) & the ‘niddy noddy’ (shown above & in ‘madonna of the yarnwinder’) …

Swifts are indeed very useful to have.  I have had mine for over 25 years!

(via madamedefargeknits)

I do!

I do!

30 Day Knitting Challenge

Day 17: Have you ever had a project that you loved become ruined? What’s the story behind it? 

I was working on my first shawl, and it was near a heat vent. This was not my first yarn of choice; it was a mustard synthetic (Fleischer’s sport). Even if I didn’t “love” it, I was appalled when the yarn discolored from the heat! I worked it up anyway, disliked it, frogged it, and reknitted it as a cardigan. It looked better that way!

Who does NOT need a crocheted narwhal?

Who does NOT need a crocheted narwhal?